TIFF

Good had its official UK premiere on 17 April, 2009; it is widely available on DVD and Blu-ray

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catloveyes
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Post by catloveyes » Wed Sep 17, 2008 4:54 pm

Oh these pics are "Gorgeous!!"

Bless your heart Hilary...whimpering is all I am doing!!! :D Jason looks fabulous, as always, way too much for me!! :adore

Hugs,
Kate

Angel Tavington
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Post by Angel Tavington » Wed Sep 17, 2008 5:04 pm

More pics, yaaaay!!

Thanks Hilary! :D





~me

Gillian
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Post by Gillian » Wed Sep 17, 2008 5:49 pm

And there's no watermarks!!
I think I love you, Hils!!!



P.S. Having said that, just because they're not watermarked, doesn't mean they're not copyright to their respective owners *cough*photoagencies*cough*. So keep that in mind, some of you.
/public service announcement.

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wolfsaver
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Post by wolfsaver » Wed Sep 17, 2008 8:51 pm

You can see that he was caught in the rain....and still looks gorgeous!

Chari910
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Post by Chari910 » Wed Sep 17, 2008 9:14 pm

Have permission to post these here. Topaz, from Viggoworks, managed to make a detail note of the Q&A sessionS:

Question & Answer Session after the Good Premiere, Sep 8/08

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I will attempt to decipher my notes and jog my memory to do an approximate transcript of the Q&A session. Quotation marks mean that I’m pretty sure I wrote down an exact quote. Otherwise it’s a paraphrase to some extent….

1. Why do we not hear a German accent in the movie?
(I think Vicente Amorim answered (?), & then Viggo added to it.) German is the native language of these people, not a second language, so they should not be speaking their native language with an accent, even in translation.
VM: Rather than a hodgepodge of fake German accents, as you get in many movies of this time period, it seemed better to have a more uniform speech so people wouldn’t get distracted and could focus more on the story. & later: “It’s not a story so much about Germans per se, but about people making decisions…. How many compromises do you make before it’s too much?”

2. (Q to Jason Isaacs re: comment on how this role is different from many of his other roles)
JI: “I never think of any of the characters I play as bad or good (that’s what this movie’s about)….

3. (Q to VA re the purpose of the music in Halder’s head in the film. It wasn’t clear if the person asking didn’t know that this was based on a play and the music was part of the play, or if he was asking why VA kept that element and what it meant to HIM.)VA: “The music heralds his subconscious – it tells him when he’s making one of those choices, to think again.”

4. (Q to VM): How did you feel wearing that SS uniform?VM: I had been in a play once wearing such a uniform, and I don’t remember that feeling strange (not that I wanted to take it HOME or anything! ) But this time the Hungarian costume designer had found and prepared all our costumes and we were trying them on. It so happened this was the last of my costumes that I tried on, and it felt kind of uncomfortable. The hat didn’t quite fit, it was a bit too small… and I remember I felt annoyed, and short-tempered, and kind of ill. And then when we were filming the night scene, I was in an incredibly bad mood…. I’m not saying I’m morally good (!) or anything, but it was like an allergic reaction, a chemical reaction…..

5. Q (I think to VA) about the lavish interiors, attention to detail in the sets.VA: We tried to use everything from the period that was as modern as possible. The filming was done in Budapest, which is a city that looks more like Berlin then than Berlin does now.

6. Q Re: The violence in the film was usually “around the corner” – not as graphic as is often the case, or seen directly. Why? (Jodie Whittaker answered this one.)JW: When you don’t see the violence as directly, it doesn’t hit you as much and so you don’t automatically disassociate yourself from it – feeling that YOU couldn’t possibly do anything like that. So it can ultimately be more powerful.

7. Q to JW: What did your character find attractive in Viggo’s character? (Oh, that was a tough one! )
JW talked about her character being passionate and needing inspiration, and that John Halder especially at the beginning was an inspiring man, standing up for his beliefs, being passionate himself about his subject in his lectures…. And after she finished talking about that she gestured back to Viggo (standing there with his wet hair reminding one of Aragorn who had been out in the wild or in the battle of Helm’s Deep for a LONG time). She said with a big smile on her face…. “And – he’s BEAUTIFUL!” (Yes, there were people in the audience who agreed! )

8. Q to VM: How did you prepare for the role?VM: He talked about how he had to work on his accent, working with fine British actors, & that he had the feeling of “Let’s not ruin this for everyone!” He said he (& others in the cast) read and re-read books from that time. He mentioned that he particularly recommends a book of first-hand accounts called What We Know. He said he went to Germany, and to Poland, went to every concentration camp he could find (or where it used to be). He talked about the subtle and often subconscious prejudice people often have (including himself) when they hear German spoken, and how he at first felt that when he was in Germany.

Then he spoke about how he went to concerts, especially to hear the music of Mahler (snippets of which we hear in Halder’s head, because for Halder it is a haven, an escape, when he gets stressed out). VM: “I happen to like Mahler as well”, so it wasn’t hard to listen to it as preparation for the role. He talked about the experience of the German concerts. He said in Italy for example an 8 p.m. concert would start about 8:10, and the audience would be passionate but not concerned about details like starting on time. In Germany the concert would start at 8:00 (if not 7:59!). At first he thought that was typical for an audience that was intellectual, and not as passionate as the Italians. But then he began to watch the audience during the concert and realized the people here WERE passionate too. They just expressed it in a different way. They were very still, intense, focused – but their response showed a genuine commitment to art…. After the concert experience VM felt differently when he heard the German language spoken.

9. Q to VA re: the theme of compassion leading to mercy killing etc. in the film.
VA: Halder’s experience of living with his suffering mother drives him to write the book about euthanasia. The Nazi euthanasia program from 1933 to 1939 needed intellectual justification, so the government called on a man like Halder to provide that. Today intellectual justification is also needed for things that governments do….


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Q&A session from TIFF 2nd showing, Sept 10/08
Only the Director was present.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


1. (Similar to a Q from the premiere): What is the significance of Mahler’s music in the film and its relationship to what is going on?
VA: The first bit of irony is that Mahler was Jewish and converted. His music here is a narrative device which was used by C.P. Taylor in the play, although in the play he used a number of composers, including contemporary ones. Every time Halder makes one of those choices, he is haunted by the music.

2. Why is Halder’s ultimate fate left unclear?
VA: That was part of the play. To give closure to this character would take away from the play. It’s not so much the fate of this one man that matters, but the effects of our choices.

3. The credits give special thanks to Elizabeth Taylor – could you elaborate?
VA: Elizabeth Taylor is C.P. Taylor’s widow, not the actress.

4. Is the film expected to get wide release in North America?
VA: I think so… although it’s not really up to me, “I think it’ll get a fairly big release for the kind of film it is.”

5. How is the film expanded from the play?
VA: It is actually very faithful to the play. Our lives are not really a linear thing – our decisions have non-linear consequences. The musical device is used as it was in the play, although here it is exclusively Mahler….

6. Re: the last long shot that ends the movie – WHEN does it start?
VA (pleased that the person couldn’t tell when it started): When he goes around the first corner. After that it is an uninterrupted 5 ½ - minute shot. We rehearsed it for 2 days, and did 10 takes of it. We were lucky that the one we ended up using had the right light. Viggo was marvelous – on each take he would surprise us. The purpose of shooting it this way was to show that this is REAL. We are not trying to cut away from it, it is really happening.

7. Was the language of the film always intended to be English?
VA: Yes. The play is in English so this made sense. Re: the fact that there are no German accents -- “for one, war films with German accents are silly”. The names were also kept English (e.g. John, rather than Johann.) All this was so that people would connect the play more to today and to their own lives.

8. Were you and Viggo always on the same page re: Halder’s character?
VA: Viggo came on board about two years before we started filming, so there was time to rehearse a lot. There was also much discussion with Viggo as well as Jason Isaacs and the producers – it was a very interesting, very rich process. “Does anyone actually consider himself GOOD?”

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Post by Angel Tavington » Thu Sep 18, 2008 9:38 am

Nice, thanks for posting the transcript of the Q&A session!





~me

Cissa
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Post by Cissa » Fri Sep 19, 2008 9:36 am

I checked out the Corbis website Vig posted... Mmm-m!

But WHY are there Mel Gibson pics interspersed with JI??? :bat

catloveyes
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Post by catloveyes » Fri Sep 19, 2008 10:56 am

Thank you dear Char for passing this on to us....and of course Topaz from Viggoworks!! :hug

Quite interesting!!

Hugs,
Kate

Gillian
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Post by Gillian » Fri Sep 19, 2008 7:10 pm

Thanks for jogging my memory, Char!

And for filling in the blanks.

marilaine
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Post by marilaine » Mon Sep 22, 2008 1:36 pm

Chari910 wrote:Have permission to post these here. Topaz, from Viggoworks, managed to make a detail note of the Q&A sessionS:

Question & Answer Session after the Good Premiere, Sep 8/08

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I will attempt to decipher my notes and jog my memory to do an approximate transcript of the Q&A session. Quotation marks mean that I’m pretty sure I wrote down an exact quote. Otherwise it’s a paraphrase to some extent….

1. Why do we not hear a German accent in the movie?
(I think Vicente Amorim answered (?), & then Viggo added to it.) German is the native language of these people, not a second language, so they should not be speaking their native language with an accent, even in translation.
VM: Rather than a hodgepodge of fake German accents, as you get in many movies of this time period, it seemed better to have a more uniform speech so people wouldn’t get distracted and could focus more on the story. & later: “It’s not a story so much about Germans per se, but about people making decisions…. How many compromises do you make before it’s too much?”

2. (Q to Jason Isaacs re: comment on how this role is different from many of his other roles)
JI:
“I never think of any of the characters I play as bad or good (that’s what this movie’s about)….
3. (Q to VA re the purpose of the music in Halder’s head in the film. It wasn’t clear if the person asking didn’t know that this was based on a play and the music was part of the play, or if he was asking why VA kept that element and what it meant to HIM.)VA: “The music heralds his subconscious – it tells him when he’s making one of those choices, to think again.”

4. (Q to VM): How did you feel wearing that SS uniform?VM: I had been in a play once wearing such a uniform, and I don’t remember that feeling strange (not that I wanted to take it HOME or anything! ) But this time the Hungarian costume designer had found and prepared all our costumes and we were trying them on. It so happened this was the last of my costumes that I tried on, and it felt kind of uncomfortable. The hat didn’t quite fit, it was a bit too small… and I remember I felt annoyed, and short-tempered, and kind of ill. And then when we were filming the night scene, I was in an incredibly bad mood…. I’m not saying I’m morally good (!) or anything, but it was like an allergic reaction, a chemical reaction…..

5. Q (I think to VA) about the lavish interiors, attention to detail in the sets.VA: We tried to use everything from the period that was as modern as possible. The filming was done in Budapest, which is a city that looks more like Berlin then than Berlin does now.

6. Q Re: The violence in the film was usually “around the corner” – not as graphic as is often the case, or seen directly. Why? (Jodie Whittaker answered this one.)JW: When you don’t see the violence as directly, it doesn’t hit you as much and so you don’t automatically disassociate yourself from it – feeling that YOU couldn’t possibly do anything like that. So it can ultimately be more powerful.

7. Q to JW: What did your character find attractive in Viggo’s character? (Oh, that was a tough one! )
JW talked about her character being passionate and needing inspiration, and that John Halder especially at the beginning was an inspiring man, standing up for his beliefs, being passionate himself about his subject in his lectures…. And after she finished talking about that she gestured back to Viggo (standing there with his wet hair reminding one of Aragorn who had been out in the wild or in the battle of Helm’s Deep for a LONG time). She said with a big smile on her face…. “And – he’s BEAUTIFUL!” (Yes, there were people in the audience who agreed! )

8. Q to VM: How did you prepare for the role?VM: He talked about how he had to work on his accent, working with fine British actors, & that he had the feeling of “Let’s not ruin this for everyone!” He said he (& others in the cast) read and re-read books from that time. He mentioned that he particularly recommends a book of first-hand accounts called What We Know. He said he went to Germany, and to Poland, went to every concentration camp he could find (or where it used to be). He talked about the subtle and often subconscious prejudice people often have (including himself) when they hear German spoken, and how he at first felt that when he was in Germany.

Then he spoke about how he went to concerts, especially to hear the music of Mahler (snippets of which we hear in Halder’s head, because for Halder it is a haven, an escape, when he gets stressed out). VM: “I happen to like Mahler as well”, so it wasn’t hard to listen to it as preparation for the role. He talked about the experience of the German concerts. He said in Italy for example an 8 p.m. concert would start about 8:10, and the audience would be passionate but not concerned about details like starting on time. In Germany the concert would start at 8:00 (if not 7:59!). At first he thought that was typical for an audience that was intellectual, and not as passionate as the Italians. But then he began to watch the audience during the concert and realized the people here WERE passionate too. They just expressed it in a different way. They were very still, intense, focused – but their response showed a genuine commitment to art…. After the concert experience VM felt differently when he heard the German language spoken.

9. Q to VA re: the theme of compassion leading to mercy killing etc. in the film.
VA: Halder’s experience of living with his suffering mother drives him to write the book about euthanasia. The Nazi euthanasia program from 1933 to 1939 needed intellectual justification, so the government called on a man like Halder to provide that. Today intellectual justification is also needed for things that governments do….


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Q&A session from TIFF 2nd showing, Sept 10/08
Only the Director was present.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


1. (Similar to a Q from the premiere): What is the significance of Mahler’s music in the film and its relationship to what is going on?
VA: The first bit of irony is that Mahler was Jewish and converted. His music here is a narrative device which was used by C.P. Taylor in the play, although in the play he used a number of composers, including contemporary ones. Every time Halder makes one of those choices, he is haunted by the music.

2. Why is Halder’s ultimate fate left unclear?
VA: That was part of the play. To give closure to this character would take away from the play. It’s not so much the fate of this one man that matters, but the effects of our choices.

3. The credits give special thanks to Elizabeth Taylor – could you elaborate?
VA: Elizabeth Taylor is C.P. Taylor’s widow, not the actress.

4. Is the film expected to get wide release in North America?
VA: I think so… although it’s not really up to me, “I think it’ll get a fairly big release for the kind of film it is.”

5. How is the film expanded from the play?
VA: It is actually very faithful to the play. Our lives are not really a linear thing – our decisions have non-linear consequences. The musical device is used as it was in the play, although here it is exclusively Mahler….

6. Re: the last long shot that ends the movie – WHEN does it start?
VA (pleased that the person couldn’t tell when it started): When he goes around the first corner. After that it is an uninterrupted 5 ½ - minute shot. We rehearsed it for 2 days, and did 10 takes of it. We were lucky that the one we ended up using had the right light. Viggo was marvelous – on each take he would surprise us. The purpose of shooting it this way was to show that this is REAL. We are not trying to cut away from it, it is really happening.

7. Was the language of the film always intended to be English?
VA: Yes. The play is in English so this made sense. Re: the fact that there are no German accents -- “for one, war films with German accents are silly”. The names were also kept English (e.g. John, rather than Johann.) All this was so that people would connect the play more to today and to their own lives.

8. Were you and Viggo always on the same page re: Halder’s character?
VA: Viggo came on board about two years before we started filming, so there was time to rehearse a lot. There was also much discussion with Viggo as well as Jason Isaacs and the producers – it was a very interesting, very rich process. “Does anyone actually consider himself GOOD?”
So, I understand that his Tavington is TOTALLY MISUNDERSTOOD, MISJUDGED? HA! I TOLD YOU IT WAS ALL CORNWALLIS' FAULT! :razzlite
Thank you for this, Char! ~M'L :cool:

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kjshd05
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Post by kjshd05 » Mon Sep 22, 2008 3:34 pm

http://www.sweetspot.ca/national/tiff_2 ... ival_tips/

scroll down for nice pic of Mr Jason at TIFF :woot
I think this was for SWAG Stuff

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Hilary the Touched
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Post by Hilary the Touched » Mon Sep 22, 2008 3:56 pm

teehee
I think Bryan Brown had been taking his own advice . . .

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Post by Gillian » Mon Sep 22, 2008 6:16 pm

He does look a little fffzzzzztttt ...

:D

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Helen8
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Post by Helen8 » Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:21 pm

His penmanship attests to that, too.

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Post by marilaine » Tue Sep 23, 2008 10:39 am

Gillian wrote:He does look a little fffzzzzztttt ...

:D
Poor Jason. :-( He does look pooped. :snore When does he ever get any sleep? (I wonder if I could :stirrer him up a little nap. :scratch)
~M'L :hug Jason :cool:

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